Roosa Wederhorn: Age and Patient Activity Dependent Alarm-Limits in Wireless Patient Monitoring

2018-04-17 15:15:00 2018-04-17 16:00:00 Europe/Helsinki Roosa Wederhorn: Age and Patient Activity Dependent Alarm-Limits in Wireless Patient Monitoring You are warmly welcome to the special assignment presentation of Ms Roosa Wederhorn on Tuesday 17 April 2018 at 15.15 in F227, Rakentajanaukio 2 C, Otaniemi. http://nbe.aalto.fi/en/midcom-permalink-1e83e399776949c3e3911e8907125a53bcf163d163d Rakentajanaukio 2 C, 02150, Espoo

You are warmly welcome to the special assignment presentation of Ms Roosa Wederhorn on Tuesday 17 April 2018 at 15.15 in F227, Rakentajanaukio 2 C, Otaniemi.

17.04.2018 / 15:15 - 16:00
F227, Health Technology House, Rakentajanaukio 2 C, 02150, Espoo, FI

Type of talk: Special Assignment presentation

Title of talk: Age and Patient Activity Dependent Alarm-Limits in Wireless Patient Monitoring

Supervisor: D.Sc. (Tech.) Matti Stenroos

Instructor: D.Sc. (Tech.) Kimmo Uutela

Place: NBE

Abstract:

Patient monitoring is used in hospitals to track patient's state of health. The alarm limits in monitoring are set to fit all the right alarms. Thus also some false alarms occur. The aim of this work is to define the need of automatically adjusted alarm limits in patient monitoring to reduce the amounts of false alarms. This work characterizes the effects of patient's age (adult 18-60, elderly >60) and patient's activities (lying, sitting, walking) in the statistical distributions of heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation of blood.

In this work altogether 36 patients were examined. The vital sign data was collected with a prototype of wireless patient-monitoring device. Care personnel annotated patient’s activity level during the measurement. The heart rate as well as respiratory rate both showed change, both by age and activity group: the averages of the aged subjects were less than with the younger subjects. Both of the parameters also showed rise in function of activity level. The oxygen saturation had statistically significant changes by activity level but clinically those changes were negligible.