ABC Seminar: Rethinking the functional role of beta oscillations in the motor system

2017-03-23 14:15:00 2017-03-23 15:15:00 Europe/Helsinki ABC Seminar: Rethinking the functional role of beta oscillations in the motor system Dr Kilner's lecture will discuss motor control in healthy people and Parkinson's patients. Kilner suggests that beta oscillations might be related to the somatosensory, afferent signal rather than the motor efferent signal, as conventionally thought. http://nbe.aalto.fi/en/midcom-permalink-1e7097795e7528a097711e7b75103a30edc20882088 Otakaari 3, 02150, Espoo

Dr Kilner's lecture will discuss motor control in healthy people and Parkinson's patients. Kilner suggests that beta oscillations might be related to the somatosensory, afferent signal rather than the motor efferent signal, as conventionally thought.

23.03.2017 / 14:15 - 15:15
F239a (Auditorio), Otakaari 3, 02150, Espoo, FI

Dr. James Kilner is a reader at the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, Institute of Neurology, London UK. 

The talk will be followed by coffee and pastries. 

Abstract: 

Rethinking the functional role of beta oscillations in the motor system

Every movement we make is associated with sensory feedback. Comparison of this feedback with the predicted sensory consequences of movement is proposed as key to successful movement control. However, the correct response to any mismatch detected relies on knowing the uncertainty associated with predicted and actual sensory feedback. What is the neural correlate of this uncertainty, and how does it enable normal control of movement? What type of movement dysfunction might occur with pathologies affecting the estimate of uncertainty ?

In this talk I will try to convince you that beta-oscillatory power is the neurophysiological correlate of the estimate of somatosensory uncertainty. Power in the beta frequency range is modulated during action preparation and execution. People with Parkinson's disease have a pathologically high power of beta oscillations, linked to the severity of key motor symptoms and normalised by successful treatment. Here I will present data from healthy people and those with movement disorders (Parkinson's Disease, Tourette's Syndrome) and try to show that beta oscillations might principally be related to the afferent somatosensory signal and not the motor efferent signal.